Recent findings show that reducing antipsychotic use among individuals with dementia living in nursing homes is feasible using a ‘real-world intervention;’ however, it may not be beneficial unless non-pharmacological interventions are provided in parallel. You have probably got 15,000 elderly people in nursing homes dying each year from the off-label use of antipsychotic medications for an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn’t work...

Let’s face it. Substandard nursing homes, do not like complaints from pesky relatives who are looking for quality care and are constantly complaining about those issues that are common in these facilities like: Poor staffing Dehydration Loss of weight Falls Bad medical care Evictions without cause Poor infection control Lack of meaningful activities Mary Jo Gleason was beside herself this past January. She was crying all the time and had no idea what to do. She had not seen her mom, Jeanie for two weeks. Jeanie was in a very poor New York nursing home. She has been there for a year, after a hospital stay for a fracture of the hip. Mary Jo visited often and therefore, got to witness the poor care of her mom’s poor care and the other residents on a daily basis. Although she complained often and loudly, the bad care persisted. In May 2012, an aide tried to get Jeanie out of bed by herself instead of calling for assistance. The aide lost her footing and down Jeanie went, fracturing her hand. What happens so often in these cases, is that an aide will not report an incident out of fear of losing her job. No physician was consulted. No accident report was filed. No x-rays were ordered. No notation was recorded on the chart. This fall occurred in the evening at about 9 P.M. and although Jeanie was in much pain, no one noticed or checked why she had pain. The next day was Jeanie’s monthly visit. Like most physician visits in Nursing Homes,...