Bill Sanders, 57, has been taking care of his 90-year-old mother for the past 14 years, both at her home in Brooklyn, New York and the nursing home where she now resides. “When I took care of my mother at home,” he explains, “I found that neighbors looked down on me. They thought I was a bum living off my mom. They didn’t believe I was really taking care of her.” Sanders thinks that a woman would not have faced this kind of ridicule. After he moved his mother to the nursing home, Sanders faced another challenge. “At first I noticed that medical personnel seemed reluctant to share information with me,” he says. “They seemed more open with my sister. Maybe it would have been different if it had been my father I was caring for.” Today, however, Sanders is not just accepted but appreciated. This former hairdresser donates his time and services to other residents of the nursing home. The Alzheimer’s Association and the National Alliance for Caregiving estimate that men make up nearly 40 percent of family care providers now, up from 19 percent in a 1996 study by the Alzheimer’s Association. About 17 million men are caring for an adult. “It used to be that when men said, ‘I’ll always take care of my mother,’ it meant, ‘My wife will always take care of my mother,”‘ said Carol Levine, director of the families and health care project at the United Hospital Fund. “But now, more and more men are doing it.” Often...

http://wcbstv.com/video/?id=142329@wcbs.dayport.com Do Not believe for a minute that this is an isolated incident!...

By Jack Halpern Nursing homes are generally prohibited from moving residents. They can transfer or discharge residents from the home only for certain reasons and, even then, only when they follow specified procedures. My Elder Advocate has a 100% success rate in preventing these evictions. Call 212-945-7550. In order to lawfully transfer or discharge a resident, the home must be able to prove that it has complied with all the procedural requirements and that the transfer or discharge is for one of the few allowable reasons. Absent such proof, the transfer or discharge must be disallowed or, if the resident has already been moved, the resident must be allowed to return to the bed, room and facility from which the resident was transferred. There are several reasons why a nursing home may try to evict a resident. From a nursing home’s perspective, the ideal resident does not require expensive care, places few demands on staff, and pays the home at the “private pay” rate. Because Medicaid and Medicare typically pay much lower rates than homes receive from their private pay clients, facilities may try to limit the size of their Medicaid-covered populations. Residents judged by the home to be “difficult” may become a target for eviction or transfer–often to a less appealing nursing home or to a psychiatric hospital. The home may claim that, regardless of the patient’s medical needs or desire to stay in the facility, Medicare-covered or “respite” admissions are time-limited (cutoff points of 20 or 90 days are often cited). For a...